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Health & Wellness

2019-2020 Talking Health

The holidays are a time to enjoy friends, family and food. And, contrary to popular belief, you can have all three without putting on the extra pounds!

On average, Americans gain approximately one to two pounds during the holiday season. While this weight gain isn’t dramatic, research shows it tends to stick and accumulate over the years. Fortunately, there are ways to enjoy the foods of holiday festivities without letting calories—or guilt—weigh you down, and without being mad at yourself in January. Avoid extra pounds through mindful eating in moderation and simple strategies for dining without depriving yourself. 

Ten Tips for Healthy Holiday Eating

 Reference: Penn State PRO Wellness <PROwellness@pennstatehealth.psu.edu>

What Parents Should Know According to the American Lung Association

There is no FDA oversight of the manufacturing of these products – which means there is no oversight regarding potentially harmful ingredients.

Are e-cigarettes less harmful than cigarettes?

Is there a difference between e-cigarettes and JUULing?

There is no FDA oversight of the manufacturing of these products – which means there is no oversight regarding potentially harmful ingredients.

  • E-cigarettes almost always contain harmful ingredients including nicotine.
  •  Acrolein, a known ingredient of many e-cigarettes, causes irreversible lung damage. Nicotine exposure during adolescence and can harm the developing brain.
  • The most popular e-cigarette among teens is JUUL
    • All JUUL pods contain some nicotine – something many youth don’t realize.
    • According to the manufacturer, one JUUL pod may contain as much nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.
  • No e-cigarette has been found to be safe and effective by FDA in helping smokers quit.
  • No. JUULs may look different, but they’re actually a type of e-cigarette.
  • E-cigarettes are battery powered and deliver nicotine through a liquid which turns into an aerosol.
  • The e-liquids come in fruit flavors that appeal to youth. JUUL is more discrete and looks like a USB drive. Other e-cigarettes may look like phones.
  • Cartridge-based e-cigarettes like JUUL contain nicotine salts that do not produce vapor or visible emissions when the device is used and may make the product even more addictive.
  • JUUL claims that some of its pods have roughly as much nicotine as an entire pack of cigarettes.

 Reference: https://www.lung.org/

Bed bug

 

After a long day of traveling, relaxing in a comfy hotel bed feels pretty great. But first you may want to give that bed a quick check. If you’re not careful, instead of travel souvenirs, you could wind up bringing home small insect pests. Find out how to avoid bringing any bugs home from your next out-of-town visit.

 

 

How to check a room for bed bugs?

 

Reference: Penn State PRO Wellness <PROwellness@pennstatehealth.psu.edu>

Truancy vs. Chronic Absence; what is the difference?

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Starting in kindergarten, too many absences can cause children to fall behind in school.
  • Missing 10 percent (or about 18 days) can make it harder to learn to read.
  • Students can still fall behind if they miss just a day or two days every few   weeks.
  • Being late to school may lead to poor attendance.
  • Absences can affect the whole classroom if the teacher has to slow down learning to help children catch up.

Attending school regularly helps children feel better about school—and themselves. Start building this habit in preschool so they learn right away that going to school on time, every day is important. Good attendance will help children do well in high school, college, and at work.

 

What families can do!

  • Find out what day school starts and make sure your child has the required shots. Build regular routines for bed time and the morning.
  • Talk about the importance of regular attendance and about how your child feels about school. Don’t permit missing school unless your child is truly sick.
  • Use a thermometer to check for a fever.
  • Remember that stomach aches and headaches may be signs of anxiety.
  • Avoid medical appointments and extended trips when school is in session.
  • Keep a chart recording your child’s attendance at home.
  • At the end of the week, talk with your child about what you see.
  • Develop back up plans for getting to school if something comes up. Ask a family member, neighbor or another parent for help.
  • Seek support from school staff or community groups to help with transportation, health problems, or no safe path to school.

DON’T WAIT -----------VACCINATE NOW
FOR ATTENDANCE IN ALL GRADES

Child
  • 4 doses of tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis* 
  • (1 dose on or after the 4th birthday)
  • 4 doses of polio
    (4th dose on or after 4th birthday and at least 6 months after previous dose given)**
  • 2 doses of measles, mumps, rubella ***
  • 3 doses of hepatitis B
  • 2 doses of varicella (chickenpox) Vaccine or history of diseas
    *Usually given as DTP or DTaP or if medically advisable DT or Td
     ** A fourth dose is not necessary if the third dose was administered at age 4 years or older and at least 6 months after the previous dose.
    ***Usually given as MMR

FOR ATTENDANCE IN 7th GRADE:

  • 1 dose of tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap)
  • 1 dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV)

 FOR ATTENDANCE IN 12th GRADE:

  • 2nd dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV) at age 16 or older.

ON THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL, a child must have had a least one dose of the above vaccinations or risk exclusion. If additional doses are still needed, the dose(s) must be received within the FIRST FIVE (5) DAYS OF SCHOOL, if medically appropriate,-NEW or risk exclusion.

These requirements allow for medical reasons and religious/philosophical beliefs.  If your child is exempt from immunizations, he/she may be removed from school during an outbreak.

Pennsylvania’s school immunization requirements can be found in 28 PA.CODE CH.23 (School Immunization)

Contact your health care provider or 1-877 PA HEALTH for more information

Reference: http://www.health.pa.gov/My%20Health/Immunizations/Documents/Don't%20Wait.%20Vaccinate%20Flyer.pdf

How to Remove a Tick

1.   Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.

2.   Pull upward with steady, even pressure to remove the tick. Avoid twisting or jerking.

3.   Clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.

How to prevent tick bites

 Protect yourself:

•  Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)- registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone. Always follow product instructions.

•  Wear clothing treated with permethrin.

•  Shower as soon as possible after spending time outdoors.

•  Check for ticks daily. Ticks can hide under the armpits, behind the knees, in the hair, and in the groin.

•  Tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed.

Notes:

•  Remove the tick as soon as possible to reduce your chances of getting an infection from the tick bite.

•  Don’t use nail polish, petroleum jelly, or a hot match to make the tick detach.

•  If tick mouthparts remain in the skin, leave them alone. In most cases, they all out in a few days.

When to see your healthcare provider

If you develop a rash, fever, exhaustion, or joint and muscle aches within several weeks of removing a tick or spending time in tick habitat, see your healthcare provider. Be sure to mention your recent tick bite and when it happened, or that you’ve spent time in places where ticks may live.

If left untreated, Lyme disease can affect the joints, heart, or nervous system.

Antibiotics treat Lyme disease

People treated with antibiotics in the early stages of Lyme disease usually recover rapidly and completely. The antibiotics most commonly used to treat Lyme disease include: doxycycline, amoxicillin, or cefuroxime axetil.

Looking ahead to recovery

Rest and take antibiotics as prescribed. Recovery may take several weeks or longer.

Some people wonder if there is a test to confirm that they are cured, but there is no such test. Retesting for Lyme disease is not recommended because blood tests might be positive for months or years after you have been treated. A positive test doesn’t mean you are still infected. It simply means that your immune system remembers your infection.

You can get Lyme disease again if you are bitten by another infected tick, so protect yourself from tick bites.

Reference: For more information see www.cdc.gov/Lyme and www.cdc.gov/Ticks

2018-2019 Talking Health

Does the very mention of potty training fill you with dread? Parents and caregivers play a key role in this training with direction, motivation and reinforcement. It can be stressful for parents and children alike, but don’t fret. Prepare for the potty training process with these practical tips and suggestions that will reassure you during any setbacks or obstacles. 

Infographic: What your pee color means  

Reference: http://prowellness.vmhost.psu.edu/toilet-training-guidelines-parents-role-parents-toilet-training

Bicycle

 Extending your life might be as simple as changing your commute. A new study found that both walking and biking to work have health benefits. In fact, active commuting had a positive effect on people regardless of numerous factors, including their sex, age, ethnicity, and smoking and eating habits. Learn more about the benefits of pedal power.

Learn more: http://prowellness.vmhost.psu.edu/want-live-longer-bike-work

Reference: Penn State PRO Wellness <PROwellness@pennstatehealth.psu.edu> 

 

'Tis the season for hugs, kisses, handshakes and the FLU! Check out these five fast facts about the flu, and learn why there's still time to protect your family from this miserable—and sometimes very serious—illness.

Learn more: http://prowellness.vmhost.psu.edu/test-flu-iq

Reference: Penn State PRO Wellness <PROwellness@pennstatehealth.psu.edu>

According to a new global report a woman in the U.S. has about a 1 in 8 chance of getting breast cancer sometime during her life. Find out the other risk factors and how to increase your chances of being in the 7 out of 8 women who never develop the disease.

Learn More: http://prowellness.vmhost.psu.edu/happenings/news

Reference: Penn State PRO Wellness <PROwellness@pennstatehealth.psu.edu>

Truancy vs. Chronic Absence; what is the difference?

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Starting in kindergarten, too many absences can cause children to fall behind in school.
  • Missing 10 percent (or about 18 days) can make it harder to learn to read.
  • Students can still fall behind if they miss just a day or two days every few   weeks.
  • Being late to school may lead to poor attendance.
  • Absences can affect the whole classroom if the teacher has to slow down learning to help children catch up.

Attending school regularly helps children feel better about school—and themselves. Start building this habit in preschool so they learn right away that going to school on time, every day is important. Good attendance will help children do well in high school, college, and at work.

 

DON’T WAIT -----------VACCINATE NOW
FOR ATTENDANCE IN ALL GRADES

Child
  • 4 doses of tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis* 
  • (1 dose on or after the 4th birthday)
  • 4 doses of polio
    (4th dose on or after 4th birthday and at least 6 months after previous dose given)**
  • 2 doses of measles, mumps, rubella ***
  • 3 doses of hepatitis B
  • 2 doses of varicella (chickenpox) Vaccine or history of diseas
    *Usually given as DTP or DTaP or if medically advisable DT or Td
     ** A fourth dose is not necessary if the third dose was administered at age 4 years or older and at least 6 months after the previous dose.
    ***Usually given as MMR

FOR ATTENDANCE IN 7th GRADE:

  • 1 dose of tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap)
  • 1 dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV)

 FOR ATTENDANCE IN 12th GRADE:

  • 2nd dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV) at age 16 or older.

ON THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL, a child must have had a least one dose of the above vaccinations or risk exclusion. If additional doses are still needed, the dose(s) must be received within the FIRST FIVE (5) DAYS OF SCHOOL, if medically appropriate,-NEW or risk exclusion.

These requirements allow for medical reasons and religious/philosophical beliefs.  If your child is exempt from immunizations, he/she may be removed from school during an outbreak.

Pennsylvania’s school immunization requirements can be found in 28 PA.CODE CH.23 (School Immunization)

Contact your health care provider or 1-877 PA HEALTH for more information

Reference: http://www.health.pa.gov/My%20Health/Immunizations/Documents/Don't%20Wait.%20Vaccinate%20Flyer.pdf

 

To help your family get ready, well before the first bell rings, check out these tips for packing healthy lunches, choosing a sturdy backpack and helping your child's school year get off to a good start.

Learn More at http://prowellness.vmhost.psu.edu/happenings/news

Reference: Penn State PRO Wellness <PROwellness@pennstatehealth.psu.edu>

 

Health & Wellness Council

Contact Information

Sheri Fredrick-Deeb
Supervisor of Health Services & Wellness
610.351.5555
deebs@parklandsd.org

Lori Seier
Director Food Services
610.351.5670
seierl1@parklandsd.org

Health & Wellness Triennial Assessment

First page of the PDF file: HWTriennialAssessment